Your browser is no longer supported! Please upgrade your web browser now.

How Harvest Is Made

You may not realize it, but almost every day there are improvements being made to Harvest while our customers are using it. Transparency is a core value here at Harvest, and I’d like to take you through a little of how we work behind the scenes, in a series of slightly technical posts.

The new Harvest Status page

We’ve just released the beta version of a tool we will be using to promote transparency between Harvest operations and our customers: the new Harvest Status Page. Bookmark this tool to keep track of how Harvest is performing at any time.

Balancing priorities

I’ll briefly walk you through the software release process we follow, and in a subsequent post I’ll talk in more detail about the tools and methods we use. If you are familiar with DevOps and the concept of continuous deployment you’ll recognize these in our workflow.

Context determines your opinion on software deployment. Our customers naturally prioritize software stability and the addition of new features as quickly as possible. Customer acquisition, avoiding outages, using cool new technology, and striving for elegant robust code are a few other priorities held by my Harvest coworkers. A natural tension can exist between these priorities. How does Harvest balance this and retain our core focus on a good customer experience?

The simplest answer is: We take small steps quickly through collaboration.

Release cycle and deployments

What may be of most interest to customers is how we deploy new code to Harvest. Harvest changes almost every day, usually multiple times per day. In the time it took me to write this blog post, two different developers deployed five production releases of Harvest. Some might be concerned that a process like this promotes poor quality software. In reality, like many other companies, we have found that this iterative, constant change promotes high quality software, exposes and resolves unexpected issues quickly and allows a distributed team to work on different features concurrently. This means, in a nutshell, that when developers deem code ready to go to production, it goes to production. No artificial release schedule governs Harvest software rollout. There is also no manager whose job it is to ensure our software quality because that is the common responsibility of every person committing code at Harvest.

100% bug-free software is an unrealistic goal, but we strive for a bare minimum of issues by having structure in place to address problems quickly and efficiently:

  • All significant code changes are peer reviewed before deployment. In the next post, I’ll talk about how we do this.
  • Every developer, designer and sysadmin at Harvest is able to (and does) deploy production code.
  • Mondays tend to be the busiest traffic day of the week at Harvest, so we rarely release big new features on Mondays. Same goes for late on Fridays, when bugs could linger over a weekend.
  • We have an internal QA process and production-similar staging environments, where we perform extensive testing when required.

Some deployments warrant special care, such as releases which involve database migrations changing large datasets. Certain database operations could produce a poor customer experience while deployments roll out. We have in the past, and will continue to deploy these releases at times of lowest customer impact, although Harvest’s global customer base reduces this window constantly. We have a maintenance mode which we can employ to take Harvest offline briefly if we need to.

If you have seen Harvest in maintenance mode and we didn’t notify you, our customer, prior to this deployment, we made a mistake and you can be sure that the team is working on the problem with urgency. It happens, but we think Harvest’s uptime speaks to how infrequently this occurs.

Obviously, when it comes to software which has a third party review process, or runs on customer desktops, such as our iPhone App and the upcoming Mac App, our process to roll out change is a little different to the core Harvest software that runs on our own servers.

If this post was too technical (or not technical enough), the one thing I hope you will take away from this is: Harvest software changes all the time in small increments. This concept of continuous deployment isn’t new or revolutionary and it may not work well for every company, but it allows us to strike a balance between stability and agility and keep forward momentum as we build a fairly complex suite of software.

Next week I’ll touch on the tools we use to review code, communicate as a team and keep on top of our infrastructure performance. If there is something you’d like me to specifically discuss, let me know in the comments or directly at warwick@getharvest.com.

Thoughts or questions about this post? Need some help?
Get in touch →

This was posted in #status, Behind-the-Scenes, Code.
  • Great to get a behind-the-scene glimpse. Thanks for the series of posts from developer perspective. I love Harvest, and had no idea it was updated so frequently.

    Is there any kind of changelog or place we could see new functionality listed?

    The Feature Request area of forum is where I usually check, but it seems like important requests (ie Late Fees or Account Statements) are acknowledged by Harvest staff then no progress or update a year or two later. Would be nice to see what actually is being worked on and deployed.

  • Thanks, Sterling. We currently don’t have a public changelog, but it is something we have thought about before and I can see the utility of it. This tag on our blog works almost like a changelog currently: new-features.

    In the meantime, the forums are a great place to talk with the support team about what is in the immediate pipeline and what isn’t.

Comments have been closed for this post.
Still have questions? Contact our support team →