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In the Field posts:

How VICE’s Creative Agency Predicts the Future With Harvest Forecast

From their provocative documentaries to their incisive reporting, VICE has been a force in the media since it first exploded into popularity at the turn of the millennia. The company now represents the success of a veritable media empire, with everything from news shows to meal kits appearing in recent years.

But one part of the VICE family that you’re probably less familiar with is Virtue, the creative agency by VICE. They’ve crafted campaigns for everyone from Lululemon to Mercedes-Benz. We were given special insight to this well-oiled machine from Mischa van Lomm, Senior Project Manager at VICE Media in Germany.

 

Mischa and teammates at VICE Virtue

 

He answered our biggest question: how do they do it? How do they execute with their signature high quality every single time — even for true industry challenges, like a client that requests a range of social assets be produced in under a month, or making a client’s wishes come true and not going over budget?

They manage their projects meticulously. From planning who is working on what for each day of every week to doing full post-mortems on large projects, Virtue maps out what exactly should happen at every step of the way using Harvest and Forecast.

The level of granular, transparent planning they can do with software outpaces any manual system, and is the key to success in the fast, hectic world of advertising.

Continue reading…

Behind The Onion’s Hyper-Productive Workflow

Part of our company mission is to help people work smarter—and that doesn’t stop with our products. We believe we can all benefit from sharing the collective wisdom of our community. So, from time to time, we dig into the inner-workings of our customers and share what we’ve learned with you. We hope these stories provide some insights and/or inspiration that you can take back to your own work. Drop us a line and let us know what you think!

When you think of how the Onion works, you might think of their legendarily tough editorial meetings: writers reading out lists of potential headlines, hoping to get a laugh (or at least a chuckle) of approval from the other very funny people sitting around the table. You might think of ClickHole, which parodies clickbait culture under its motto that “all content deserves to go viral.”

You probably don’t think about the nuts-and-bolts of how the Onion produces such a high volume of hilarious content every single day—but the truth is that’s just as impressive.

The Onion production team shooting with SNL’s Kenan Thompson.

The Onion was born in Madison, Wisconsin as a weekly print paper and quickly acquired a reputation for their satirical take on the news. They started publishing their articles online earlier than most publications—in the spring of 1996—to stem the flow of “bootleg” versions being disseminated without proper attribution.

Today, the Onion is fully online, with five properties (the Onion, the A.V. Club, ClickHole, Onion Labs, and Onion Studios) and partnerships with film companies like Lionsgate.

We knew that bringing the Onion into the 21st century had to mean bringing their workflow along too—they’re a Harvest customer, after all—so to get the full scoop, we reached out to Rick Livingston, director of post-production at the Onion.

Continue reading…

Using Zapier to Improve Your Harvest Workflow

In this guest post Kim Kadiyala explains how using Zapier to connect Harvest to your favorite tools can make your team’s workflow even more efficient.

Like thumbprints or snowflakes, no two workflows are quite the same. Every company has their own way of doing business, one that’s evolved over time to meet the preferences and priorities of that particular team.

As you add tools to your workflow, however, it’s easy for it to become unwieldy. That’s why it’s essential for the tools you use to work together. Otherwise, you might find yourself wasting time switching between them or manually duplicating tasks across multiple platforms. Harvest’s integrations are a great way to connect Harvest to the other tools in your workflow. But if you’re looking for even more options, Zapier might be the answer.

Zapier is a web app automation tool that lets you send data from Harvest to over 750 apps, including Slack, Google Calendar, Asana, Trello—no coding knowledge necessary. With a few clicks, you can create Zaps (automations) that link all the tools you use in one seamless workflow, automating the manual tasks you’d rather not spend time on.

Here are stories from three Harvest customers who used Zapier to link Harvest to other tools and make their workflows more efficient. Hopefully they inspire you with ideas for improving your own workflow and saving time. Continue reading…

One Is the Loneliest Number

How PMs who work alone can get feedback from peers

 

The second installment in our series of interviews with project managers brings us to London for a conversation with Holly Davis, an agile project manager at Deeson. She has worked as a PM at White October and has served as a contributor at Every Day DPM. She addresses a problem confronted by many PMs: how to get feedback on your work and grow in your job if you’re the only project manager at your company.

Tell us a little about your role and the work you’ve been part of. What are you most proud of?

I work at Deeson, one of the UK’s longest-established open source agencies. We build innovative, stable, and effective digital properties for a range of high-profile companies and organizations.

My role as an agile project manager involves providing high-level, agile-style leadership to the development team, managing the working environment in which the solution is evolving, and coordinating all aspects of project management at a high level.

In terms of work I’m really proud of, in my previous role at White October I was part of the team that designed and developed Let’s Talk FGM, an iPad app that helps health professionals talk to patients about female genital mutilation. We had a small budget but designed and developed a brilliant tool for social good which even won a London Design Award at the end of last year. It’s hugely rewarding to build something that has the ability to change lives. Continue reading…

What’s in a Name?

One producer wrestles with the ambiguity of her title.

All sorts of people use Harvest to track their time, but we know Harvest holds a special place in the heart of many project managers. We’ve had the opportunity to meet a lot of these PMs and hear about the unique challenges of a job that doesn’t often get a lot of attention. So, we created a column on our blog for PMs to share their biggest challenges and inspire each other with creative ways to tackle them.

Our first contributor is Grace Steite Masri, a senior producer at Your Majesty who has previously worked at Big Spaceship.

grace-steite-masri-min Grace, center, with the Your Majesty team at their Swedish Midsummer celebration.

Tell us a little about your company.

Your Majesty is a digital agency based in Manhattan. Our work is primarily geared toward web design and development, but includes everything from branding and advertising to experiential work. Continue reading…

In the Field: How ‘Discernment’ Allows Anchour to Do Great Work for Its Clients

Part of our company mission is to help people work smarter—and that doesn’t stop with our products. We believe we can all benefit from sharing the collective wisdom of our community. That’s why we’ve created this column called In the Field.

In it we’ll feature interviews with Harvest customers, unpacking how they work, how their teams are organized, and what makes them unique. Hopefully it will allow you an opportunity to peer inside someone else’s company and provide some insights that you can take back to your own work.

For our first In the Field column we head to Lewiston, Maine to chat with Anchour, a branding, design, and web development firm. Managing Director Stephen Gilbert talks to us about how he got his start, how the Anchour team works together, and how the element of ‘discernment’ allows them to deliver quality work for their clients.

Continue reading…